Strokecast

Episode 019 — Meet Dr. Lorig — English Transcript

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You can listen to the original episode here: Meet Dr. Lorig.

Date: 2018-06-23
Timezone: -07:00:00
13:20:01:Presenter: Welcome to the stroke cast a generation X stroke Survivor explorers rehab recovery the frontiers of neuroscience and how to peel a banana with one hand.
13:20:15:Presenter: Hello. And welcome to episode 19 of stroke tasked. I’m Bill Monroe.
13:20:25:Presenter: A few weeks ago, I met doctor denby leave through my work with the young adult stroke survivors group here in Seattle.
13:20:30:Presenter: Denbeigh is an assistant professor of occupational therapy at the University of Washington.
13:21:16:Presenter: and, well, she’s awesome, she’s working on initiatives to involve stroke survivors with researchers earlier in the research process to provide better outcomes for all especially around the topic gov community reintegration after stroke at the young adult stroke survivors group we have a library for members and dad be recently contributed a recent book one on which he is one of the coauthors the book is called building better care givers, and it’s a collection of tools to help caregivers better manage the new situation they find th emselves in after a loved one has a stroke encounters dementia or has to deal with other conditions that can impact cognitive and
13:21:46:Presenter: today, i’m joined by doctor kate lorik, the lead author of the book, and we had a great chapter about the book and about how to help caregivers for we get
13:21:46:Presenter: And, well, she’s awesome. She’s working on initiatives to involve stroke survivors with researchers earlier in the research process to provide better outcomes for all especially around the topic gov community reintegration after stroke at the young adult stroke survivors group we have a library. For members and dad be recently contributed a recent book one on which he is one of the coauthors the book is called building better care givers. And it’s a collection of tools to help caregivers better manage the new situation they find themselves in after a loved one has a stroke encounters dementia or has to deal with other conditions that can impact cognitive and emotional functioning.
13:21:47:Presenter: Today. I’m joined by doctor Kate Lorik, the lead author of the book, and we had a great chapter about the book and about how to help caregivers for we get started, I do want to mention that out we did talk. About a few links and you can find all of those links over its stroke cast dot com slash Kate. That’s the only link you need to memorize stroke gas dot com slash gate or you could just look for the show notes over at stroke gas dot com.
13:22:13:Presenter: we do use the terms caregiver and care partner in this episode the caregiver is the person helping the survivor of a condition like the stroke survivor dicaire partner on the other hand is the one with the condition, so with that out of the way let’s go ahead and meet doctor lorig who i believe is also the first guest on this podcast with her own
13:22:32:Presenter: doctor lorig is a professor emerita at stanford university school of medicine and a partner in the self management resource center as director of the
13:22:32:Presenter: We do use the terms caregiver and care partner in this episode the caregiver is the person helping the Survivor of a condition like the Stroke Survivor Dicaire partner on the other hand is the one with the condition. So with that out of the way let’s go ahead and meet doctor lorig who I believe is also the first guest on this podcast with her own Wikipedia page.
13:22:33:Presenter: Doctor lorig is a professor emerita at Stanford University School of Medicine and a partner in the self management resource center as director of the Stanford Patient Education Research Center. She was a code developer of the building better caregivers program.
13:22:39:Presenter: For 20 years keep watched her mother care for her father who was severely disabled by a stroke.
13:22:45:Presenter: And we’ll hear more about her story in just a moment. So with that.
13:22:47:Presenter: Let’s meet cake.
13:22:57:Presenter: It’s OK. Thank you. So much for joining me this morning despite some of our articles names but I am I like the drive, that’s why did to be with you all.
13:23:37:Presenter: are, you know, i think when we talk about this field of working with folks who are dealing with with challenges and often need a caretaker in our case in my case obviously we’re talking about stroke survivors as primary focus deal with but why is it that you chose to go into this field of a lot of sinning expertise sided with caregiving in one way or another has been a peripheral part of my life since i was a very young woman when i first worked in the hospital as
13:23:58:Presenter: there was an older woman that was there that had been hospitalised for some sort of dementia that that point she basically lived in the hospital and
13:23:58:Presenter: Are I think when we talk about this field of working with folks who are dealing with with challenges and often need a caretaker in our case in my case obviously we’re talking about stroke survivors as primary focus. Deal with but why is it that you chose to go into this field of a lot of sinning expertise sided with caregiving in one way or another has been a peripheral part of my life since I was a very young. Woman when I first worked in the hospital as a teenager.
13:23:59:Presenter: There was an older woman that was there that had been hospitalised for some sort of dementia that point she basically lived in the hospital and I felt so very helpless because there was really nothing that any of us could. Do except her for her physically and I was too young to try or even think about doing anything else.
13:24:08:Presenter: And then my father had a stroke in his mid sixties and lived in another 20 years.
13:24:38:Presenter: Being both physically impaired although he was able to walk for many of those years and also having aphasia and not really being able to express himself. Well, and I watch my mother being a superb caregiver during those years and then recently I had 102 year old mother who died just within the past year and while i was not responsible for her care directly i help support my. Brother and sister in there.
13:25:12:Presenter: Wow. That’s an amazing longevity. And I think what’s really important is that, you know, living into your eighties after a stroke living with 102 that is really a testament to the support that i remember back on it. Now, then that’s very true. And then I actually should have that the way I kind of.
13:25:33:Presenter: Kind of got shoved into this professionally was about, I don’t know, it was probably maybe 8 years ago. Now, I can’t tell you. Exactly. Did Veterans Administration started a new caregiver initiative and as part of that initiative they asked us to put together in online.
13:25:36:Presenter: Cause for caregiving.
13:25:55:Presenter: *** especially for veterans with PTSD and traumatic brain injury. And that’s where we formally pushed did building better caregivers, it’s an online program, which is still to this day available to all bets into a caring for someone or someone in that it’s caring for A.. Best friend.
13:26:20:Presenter: And that’s why we have been available for many years and more recently we decided we wanted to try to see whether we could do this in a small group format as well. So we did a building better caregivers program in small groups and then wrote the book to accompany their program. But also to help people but for whatever reason could not attend one of those programs.
13:26:35:Presenter: That’s one of the things that is really interesting when we start looking at some of the things that have happened around stroke and T V I these days is that.
13:27:27:Presenter: there is so much more research being done as a result of the war is that the country has been involved in the resources the veterans administration now has to place towards these things, it’s one of those things that at the same time is tragic that we’ve gotten that we had t hat there is that need but at the same time the upside is that there is a lot more research and resources standing these things then they’re used to be is a book of tools for kids with the bucket set up specifically for people that are caring for someone who has had a stroke who has alzheimer’s parkinson’s or TV i things have the source and it’s to give them a big group of tools and justice like any
13:27:55:Presenter: don’t use the tools every single day, but you need to have them when you want them one of our caregivers said to me, you know, i’ve had
13:27:56:Presenter: There is so much more research being done as a result of the war is that the country has been involved in the resources the veterans administration. Now has to place towards these things. It’s one of those things that at the same time is tragic that we’ve gotten that we had that there is that need but at the same time the upside is that there is a lot more research and resources. Standing these things then they’re used to be is a book of tools for kids with the bucket set up specifically for people that are caring for someone who has had a stroke who has Alzheimer’s Parkinson’s or TV. I things have the source and it’s to give them a big group of tools and justice like any tool, you.
13:27:58:Presenter: Don’t use the tools every single day, but you need to have them when you want them one of our caregivers said to me, you know I’ve had this huge wrench in my garage years and. Never knew what to do with it until one day the water main broke and I had the right tool. And that’s where trying to do with the book is give people tools some of which they can use everyday starting now and some of which they can have in their back pocket should they ever need them.
13:28:46:Presenter: that’s, yeah, that’s, that’s a great way of looking at it’s kind of like those bolt cutters, i have stored it into my bed at this point but i wonder things i noticed about it as i was flipping through it, and we talk about the tools a lot of the tools that are in there are everything from if this is happening, this is what you need to do, this is why you need to do it, and this is what you say at each step of this conversation with her, it’s running a family meeting to talk about how to get support as a caregiver or how to help communicate with doctors and medical teams to make them more effective in the care of the care partner and, you
13:29:23:Presenter: a lot of it seems like it’s not necessarily really super advanced things you need to do but those basic things that unless you’ve done
13:29:23:Presenter: That’s, that’s a great way of looking at it’s kind of like those bolt cutters I have stored it into my bed at this point but I wonder things I noticed about it as I was flipping. Through it, and we talk about the tools a lot of the tools that are in there are everything from if this is happening. This is what you need to do, this is why you need to do it. And this is what you say at each step of this conversation with her, it’s running a family meeting to talk about how to get support as a caregiver or how to help communicate with doctors and medical teams to make. Them more effective in the care of the care partner and, you know.
13:29:27:Presenter: a lot of it seems like it’s not necessarily really super advanced things you need to do but those basic things that unless you’ve done this before you don’t necessarily know when you’re stressed out you don’t have necessarily the resources to figure this stuff out on your own, so it provides a nice base Z, i think we’re trying to keep the caregiver healthy because one of the things that we know about caregiving is that it’s bad for one’s health and so there’s a lot of tips there in just things like nutrition and exercise and sleep for the
13:29:28:Presenter: and then we’ll also trying to give them tools to work with their
13:29:28:Presenter: A lot of it seems like it’s not necessarily really super advanced things you need to do but those basic things that unless you’ve done this before you don’t necessarily know when you’re stressed out you don’t have necessarily. The resources to figure this stuff out on your own. So it provides a nice base Z, I think we’re trying to keep the caregiver healthy because one of the things that we know about caregiving is that it’s bad for one’s health. And so there’s a lot of tips there in just things nutrition and exercise and sleep for the caregiver them selves.
13:29:33:Presenter: And then we’ll also trying to give them tools to work with their care partners.
13:29:33:Presenter: How do they have tools is to think about things in a different way?
13:29:47:Presenter: when when i partner hasn’t had doesn’t have a stroke or doesn’t have all timers we kind of related to them in one way and we assume that their behavior is caused by their own happiness in their pleasure
13:30:04:Presenter: in fact, very often what happens with someone is that their behavior is caused by the disease or by the the problem, and if
13:30:04:Presenter: When I partner hasn’t had doesn’t have a stroke or doesn’t have all timers we kind of related to them in one way and we assume that their behavior is caused by their own happiness in their pleasure or whatever.
13:30:05:Presenter: In fact, very often what happens with someone is that their behavior is caused by the disease or by the problem, and if you look at it as my care partners trying to just trying to get me.
13:30:07:Presenter: Then the reaction is anger.
13:30:27:Presenter: If you look at it as.
13:30:28:Presenter: Maybe my caregiver is bored and they need some stimulation. I wonder what would happen if we took a walk it’s the exact same behavior, but it’s how to care partner sees that behavior that can make all the difference in the relationship.
13:31:05:Presenter: by way of analogy, it’s one of those things where you know, there are lots of reasons, why somebody could have trouble walking just like, there are lots of reasons, why it’s somebody could be acting out they could be having trouble walking coz they heard their leg or , you know, ’cause they really went to me paresis or because they’re just tired and they were just like, there are so many other reasons why they could be acting out and it’s important to go out and look at i think, you know, think about it very often but now you have a very
13:31:09:Presenter: i’ll behaviors which they are
13:31:09:Presenter: By way of analogy. It’s one of those things where you know, there are lots of reasons. Why somebody could have trouble walking just like, there are lots of reasons. Why it’s somebody could be acting out they could be having trouble walking Coz they heard their leg or you know, ’cause they really went to me Paresis or because they’re just tired and they were just like there are. So many other reasons why they could be acting out and it’s important to go out and look at i think think about it very often but now you have a very limited range.
13:31:09:Presenter: I’ll behaviors which they are really capable.
13:31:15:Presenter: If you don’t have brain damage you have a much broader range of behaviors.
13:31:17:Presenter: You know you make my AC.
13:31:30:Presenter: Very busy sometimes very limited. And so anger pleasure boredom pain or may look exactly the same.
13:31:46:Presenter: And unfortunately sometimes folks cannot express what’s going on with them. And so it’s up to the caregiver can kind of guess to try some different things, but also to look at things in a bit different way.
13:32:20:Presenter: and i think will tell also really cool really important to is the way you’re talking about, you know, keeping that caregiver healthy and helping them have the mental and social resources they need to live their life because in injured or tired or sick caregiver , they can’t Y would happen once again, anyway, you ever feel, well, i’m the only one that can do this or no one can do it as well as
13:32:28:Presenter: that may or may not be true as far as being able to do it as well as you can but you don’t always have to have an
13:32:28:Presenter: And I think will tell also really cool. Really important to is the way you’re talking about, you know, keeping that caregiver healthy and helping them have the mental and social resources they need to live their life because in injured or tired or sick caregiver. They can’t Y would happen once again, anyway, you ever feel, well, I’m the only one that can do this or no one can do it as well as I can.
13:32:28:Presenter: That may or may not be true as far as being able to do it as well as you can but you don’t always have to have an A plus.
13:32:37:Presenter: It. Maybe that you will be able to do better care over a long period of time.
13:32:45:Presenter: If you get some help and, yes that help may not be able to do things as well as you can but they do them adequately. So what?
13:33:15:Presenter: And that’s what’s important because they keep you healthy you write longer. So that you can keep doing things and sometimes the help can do things better than you can I was visiting a friend the other day that finally got some help in the house after doing everything all them selves for very. Long time and one of the things that I realized immediately with the help with much more able to help turn the individual.
13:33:31:Presenter: Pocket individual with much calmer and probably in the long run the person was getting better care with the help than without the help that it’s a really hard thing care caregivers didn’t ask for this job.
13:33:39:Presenter: You know, we don’t call you don’t usually grow up saying what I really want to do in life is be exposed caregiver.
13:33:46:Presenter: And they actually choose the job because there’s a lot of people put in a position where they could be caregivers.
13:34:11:Presenter: That is the walk away. Unfortunately, we see that all too often or in some other way avoiding caregiver is, so the fact that they are caregivers means that this is something that they have volunteered to do even though sometimes care group is why there’s. No, I don’t have any choice. Well, yes, you do have a choice you may not think you have a choice but you do you actually do.
13:34:40:Presenter: Every making a joint up in your menu might leave you are at least I said I should also say that some of the other tools that we give in the book if we give a whole bunch of tools that have. To do with safety and equipment for caregivers are all of a sudden face of all this stuff and people wanting to sell them things. And so what we tried to do is give a lot of hints on.
13:34:51:Presenter: I’m just gadgets and things that will make life a little bit easier.
13:34:51:Presenter: And I can’t it’s not that we use every one of them, you just need to know they exist so that if you ever need them, you can find them.
13:35:29:Presenter: You know, when you’re in the hospital and getting through all that they’ll tell you OK here’s the cane you’re going to need or here’s me walking you’re going to need and you know A.. Caregiver who is plunged into this world overnight because not only is it something nobody plans to do when they grow up. It’s something nobody plans to find themselves needing to do tomorrow, and that’s how people trying to find space. So interested in gravity University all the night and take it can’t really expect somebody to do that.
13:35:30:Presenter: I don’t know.
13:35:30:Presenter: Nope.
13:35:48:Presenter: How can a caregiver stay healthy?
13:36:15:Presenter: Now a lot of stuff about communicating with care partners and trying to figure out care partners behaviors and how to mitigate stress because the biggest problems with caregivers of stress and depression.
13:36:17:Presenter: And those are something that we can do something about at least very often and then we also have large sections of the book dealing with such things as a how do you get help into the home where do you find. Help, and if you need if you think that you really need to do a place where what sorts of placements it out board and care homes appropriate is assisted living appropriate.
13:36:18:Presenter: Hello. Well, I’ll be keeping things from me.
13:36:28:Presenter: We do some talking about family meeting. So that you can get help from family and friends and then we also do some things around.
13:36:50:Presenter: Where is the caregiver Kathy a caregiver anymore? It’s going to take over and what is the legal things that you need to have in place.
13:36:51:Presenter: And so again, we talk about some of the kind of not in great depth, but it is not step to get people started, so they sent thinking of all the legal things that, that, that around here giving.
13:37:25:Presenter: is a ton of that back getting started in really just a whole bunch of lists of additional resources that they can leverage in, you know, everything from, you know, sites across the web to their personal community, and the network of resources that are around them and how to draw on those resources in work with other folks because i mean, i’m finally starting now laboratory test everything looks like in united states has a thing called an area agency
13:37:32:Presenter: and all you have to do is look in the phone book under area agency
13:37:32:Presenter: Is a ton of that back getting started in really just a whole bunch of lists of additional resources that they can leverage in everything from, you know, sites across the web to their personal community, and the network of. Resources that are around them and how to draw on those resources in work with other folks because I’m finally starting now laboratory test everything looks like in United States has a thing called an area agency on aging.
13:37:33:Presenter: And all you have to do is look in the phone book under area agency on aging.
13:37:33:Presenter: I look on the Web.
13:38:14:Presenter: and the area agency on aging really knows pretty much all the resources in your area for strokes for all timers for caregiving in general and people said, but i’m not aging, well, everybody’s aging but but but if you’re not, you know, it’s tough on your area agency on aging because the problem sometimes even younger people have similar problems, and so anybody can call mrs a resource is actually paid for it by an agency of our federal government called the administration
13:38:17:Presenter: and it’s a
13:38:17:Presenter: And the area agency on aging really knows pretty much all the resources in your area for strokes for all timers for caregiving in general and people said, but I’m not aging, well, everybody’s aging but if you. ‘re not, it’s tough on your area agency on aging because the problem sometimes even younger people have similar problems. And so anybody can call Mrs a resource is actually paid for it by an agency of our federal government called The Administration community living.
13:38:23:Presenter: And it’s a terrific resource.
13:38:29:Presenter: I want to sing, unfortunately people very often don’t understand they really have one in their area.
13:38:30:Presenter: Can, I don’t care whether it’s rural Iowa or.
13:38:30:Presenter: It is an area agency.
13:38:56:Presenter: So we talk about a lot of this collaborative effort putting together this book looks like it was a huge collaborative effort right now you’ve got a ton of CO authors are listed on this book, and what was it where. I’m going with such thing I would say you could turn into sports devil books on.
13:39:04:Presenter: OK now I’m living with chronic illness and whenever we’d put together a book or put together a workshop.
13:39:16:Presenter: What we always do is we always start out by asking the people that.
13:39:16:Presenter: I did now. And so the way we put these together they pushed talk to lots and lots of caregivers.
13:39:19:Presenter: And we said so what are the problem.
13:39:42:Presenter: Because what we want to do is we want to write books around people about the problems that people see and help them solve those problems. Not what we have health professional think they need to know, so that’s the first thing we did and then the second thing we did is we read a ton of books on caregiving and pulled out all the common themes.
13:40:04:Presenter: And then.
13:40:06:Presenter: but we we had ourselves and we had people that we had patients go through those lists and tell us which ones which were the things that were really important, so that’s the way we ended up getting our content and then the next thing to do is i’m certainly not an expert on
13:40:24:Presenter: is that we got people that were experts in various areas an assigned chapters, and then we read each others chapters, and we
13:40:24:Presenter: But we had ourselves and we had people that we had patients go through those lists and tell us which ones which were the things that were really important. So that’s the way we ended up getting our content and then the next thing to do is I’m certainly not an expert on all these things.
13:40:25:Presenter: Is that we got people that were experts in various areas an assigned chapters, and then we read each others chapters, and we edit each other chapters and it’s a huge effort of passing around manuscripts until you kind of get. The final product.
13:40:26:Presenter: I find it.
13:40:39:Presenter: i find it for me at least something that’s very exciting to do because what i know is we’re getting the very very best information more in gas who did the parts
13:40:43:Presenter: is has a doctorate in
13:40:43:Presenter: I find it for me at least something that’s very exciting to do because what I know is we’re getting the very best information more in gas who did the parts on safety.
13:41:00:Presenter: Has a doctorate in occupational therapy?
13:41:01:Presenter: i don’t know that stuff, yeah, i could read it in books, but i would not have gotten anywhere near the depth that she got a million minor who does the things on exercise with idina physical therapy at the university
13:41:11:Presenter: rob schriver who wrote about the different diseases is a geriatrician with hebrew senior life
13:41:11:Presenter: I don’t know that stuff, I could read it in books, but I would not have gotten anywhere near the depth that she got a million minor who does the things on exercise with Idina physical therapy at the University of Missouri.
13:41:11:Presenter: Rob Schriver who wrote about the different diseases is a geriatrician with Hebrew Senior life in Massachusetts. So.
13:41:18:Presenter: We kind of had to go to two wheel experts in all the fields to get the very best input we could.
13:41:36:Presenter: I want to things I notice that I was actually a little surprised about as I read it is that the voice of the book though is remarkably consistent from one chapter to the next.
13:42:14:Presenter: you know, when i’ve read other books that are really compliment compilations and collections of resources from other from other folks in other places all all brought together, you know, that can be really valuable, but when you go from one section to the next you can tell that it was written by somebody else, that’s not necessarily a bad thing, it’s just nothing but in this book, it’s, it is remarkably consistent voice, so it really seems like it was a cellular phone number person writing it in this direction star office about how to write a nd some of them can do it in some of them don’t
13:42:25:Presenter: we pass it around at it, it and send it back and pass it around and i say we because it’s probably three
13:42:25:Presenter: You know, when I’ve read other books that are really compliment compilations and collections of resources from other from other folks in other places all all brought together that can be really valuable. But when you go from one section to the next you can tell that it was written by somebody else. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. It’s just nothing but in this book. It is remarkably consistent voice. So it really seems like it was a cellular phone number person writing it in this direction star office about how to write and some of them can do it in some of them don’t and then.
13:42:31:Presenter: We pass it around at, it and send it back and pass it around and I say we because it’s probably three or four main authors where we passed the chapters around between us.
13:42:31:Presenter: Many times quite frankly. There’s a couple of those chapters that if I ever have to see again, I’m going to scream.
13:42:35:Presenter: I want to tell you which ones.
13:42:49:Presenter: I’m sure that we worked really hard at that. And we get it, right? Most of the time as I was looking at the book. The other day, I was thinking is this could probably be at it a little bit more but.
13:42:51:Presenter: In some point you have to quit.
13:43:08:Presenter: Exactly, what if the things one of my high school English teachers taught me Dennis Falucci said you say this all the time and it stuck with me that sounds good baby. I never finished.
13:43:11:Presenter: You can always do more editing.
13:43:20:Presenter: So as we look at what caregivers are doing in Newark caregivers. What is?
13:43:38:Presenter: One thing that you wish more people man. I’m about out here. It’s very, very special people and they need support and for those people that are not caregivers just saying what is it, it is anything. I can do please tell me.
13:43:40:Presenter: Is not enough?
13:43:45:Presenter: The people that are not care givers and don’t know what to do.
13:43:52:Presenter: Offer something can I come and sit for half an hour can I bring you lunch.
13:43:57:Presenter: Maybe you will not tolerate being with somebody.
13:44:02:Presenter: That has all timers 10 i in that case.
13:44:07:Presenter: Is there a way that you can come to bed have lunch with me someday.
13:44:10:Presenter: It’s awful.
13:44:13:Presenter: To think of things.
13:44:27:Presenter: Be there and be there in the long run it doesn’t mean that you have to be there every day or every week, but it almost means you can put on the calendar and say, I’m going to call Aunt Betty. Every month.
13:44:43:Presenter: Or things about sex offenders. That’s what I would like to say is don’t abandon people that are caregivers and if you are a caregiver my advice is know that there is help.
13:44:51:Presenter: Even if you think there is no help there probably is it’s going to be up to you to try to find it.
13:45:02:Presenter: And this is going to make all the difference in your skill as a caregiver and also in your ability to do caregiving over a longer period time.
13:45:50:Presenter: you know, when you mention the idea of asking how asking somebody if you can do something specific and coming up with ideas, i think that’s one of those things that were just starting to hear a little bit more about in people talking about in that the sheer amount of energy it takes to make a decision and when you say to somebody what can i do to help your in some respect your offering assistance but at the same time, you’re also giving them yet another job of coming up with a list of things that you could do to help and then they have to filter that i can figure out what you can do to help before they actually going to ask for
13:46:12:Presenter: are you really? didn’t do it to make a list of things that they would like help with, so when people
13:46:12:Presenter: You know when you mention the idea of asking how asking somebody if you can do something specific and coming up with ideas. I think that’s one of those things that were just starting to hear a little bit more about in people talking about in that the sheer amount of energy it takes to make a decision and when you say to somebody. What can I do to help in some respect your offering assistance? But at the same time, you’re also giving them yet. Another job of coming up with a list of things that you could do to help and then they have to filter that I can figure out what you can do to help before they actually going to ask for help Z. Think that.
13:46:13:Presenter: Are you? Really didn’t do it to make a list of things that they would like help with. So when people offer is they can come up with a specific suggestion and let me give you an example, it’s not exactly the same field, but they’re almost as many years ago, I had lymphoma.
13:46:38:Presenter: And people were constantly saying to me what can you do to help and I finally realized it was up to me to tell them. And so my neighbor who is from another country asked what he could do to help I said, oh, what you could do to help would be to take out my garbage every week, it’s not a big task. It’s rolinga been from my back door to the curb.
13:46:45:Presenter: She was delighted to do that. And what’s even better is just came years later, he still doing it.
13:46:49:Presenter: And he knows he doesn’t have to.
13:47:06:Presenter: I’m nice, but it’s, it kind of became a bonding experience. And we both know each other a bit better because of this.
13:47:06:Presenter: And I give it is example, because at the time the energy truck to move the garbage was just something I didn’t have.
13:47:26:Presenter: and so it’s up to the caregiver to the think about things in which people could help and some of them are big things and some of them are little things i had a friend just two days ago who has been a caregiver and it’s probably going to
13:47:39:Presenter: find a placement for the person that she’s caring for asked me if i would go with her to several different skilled nursing facilities to help
13:47:39:Presenter: And so it’s up to the caregiver to the think about things in which people could help and some of them are big things and some of them are little things I had a friend just two days ago who has. Been a caregiver and it’s probably going to have to.
13:47:39:Presenter: Find a placement for the person that she’s caring for asked me if I would go with her to several different skilled nursing facilities to help her have another pair of eyes.
13:47:41:Presenter: And I said, of course.
13:47:52:Presenter: You know I have a couple of afternoons I can do that. It’s not my decision, but what she needs is another pair of eyes and why not.
13:48:11:Presenter: Absolutely, it almost sounds like one thing I caregiver could do is simply sort of maintain essentially an attack pulls up many girls are always things.
13:48:20:Presenter: Thank it, maybe little things it be really helpful, if you could bring me a meal twice a month or you make a wonderful chocolate cake.
13:48:25:Presenter: Can I have a chocolate cake every other month it could be little things?
13:49:15:Presenter: fried absolutely does does little things that make up everyday in our lives and can really provide that fight that break and that’s one of those other things too that i found that i’ve personally struggled with as as i’ve done with my own stroke recovery over the last year i s recognizing that i don’t, it’s OK to ask for help ask for help, you know, for my caregiver and from other folks is that asking for help in letting people help you is a way that you can actually do that for me and give us mickey avalon to help and then it’s actually if you if you put your request in a range that, you know, that they
13:49:20:Presenter: I mean, if you ask somebody could you please come and stay with my husband for 6 weeks while i go to europe.
13:49:20:Presenter: Fried absolutely. Does little things that make up everyday in our lives and can really provide that fight that break and that’s one of those other things too that I found that I’ve personally struggled with as I’ve done. With my own stroke recovery over the last year is recognizing that I don’t, it’s OK to ask for help ask for help for my caregiver and from other folks is that asking for help in letting people help. You is a way that you can actually do that for me and give us Mickey Avalon to help and then it’s actually if you if you put your request in a range that, you know that they can achieve.
13:49:24:Presenter: Probably not.
13:49:33:Presenter: Could you please calm and stay for an afternoon while I get my hair done? Sure.
13:50:00:Presenter: So this is a great resource Z way is to just go to the website of Bull publisher. It’s just look up on the line in both publication of a book publisher then Boulder Colorado an everybody that word is a book directly from go get to 20 percent discount and they get free shipping.
13:50:11:Presenter: Awesome. And that make up cortana Amazon and it’s like that stupid way to do it.
13:50:14:Presenter: Sure.
13:50:56:Presenter: absolutely absolutely are there any other projects, you’re involved ask that you wanted to check these two things that you might want to know one is we just starting to give and it’s not very widely spread yet a new program called building better caregivers the same name as the book, which is a course, which is two and a half hours a week for 6 weeks and it is available in a few communities around the country i think at this point it’s available in detroit and maybe in cleveland and the other thing that i think is more important is the for anybody that is caring
13:51:06:Presenter: Or is it better themselves caring for someone else. There is a 6 week workshop online and it’s not just a.
13:51:06:Presenter: Absolutely are there any other projects? You’re involved ask that you wanted to check these two things that you might want to know one is we just starting to give and it’s not very widely spread yet a new program called building better caregivers the same. Name as the book, which is a course, which is two and a half hours a week for 6 weeks and it is available in a few communities around the country i think at this point. It’s available in Detroit and maybe in Cleveland and the other thing that I think is more important is for anybody that is caring for veterans.
13:51:44:Presenter: Ridendo workshop. It’s a workshop where you actually get to take you get to talk to about 20 other caregivers that are in the workshop and when i say talk this is all done by dreaded bulletin boards. So if you have a problem, you can write to get responses. There’s Moderat Yrs and it’s not real time. So you can log on as many times as you want for 6 weeks to get into that program which is free you need to be re ferd by the caregiver support person at the VA and everything will be in. Country as a caregiver support person and.
13:52:25:Presenter: so talk to the people to the day, and that’s the way you get in the program, and then i would coming to say one other thing that really gonna get people want to do resource which i know caregiver sometimes have a hard time leaving home , but there are lots and lots of free community programs on living with chronic conditions on pain exercise all of which have been shown to be helpful to people that is there evidence space, and there’s a wonderful website with the with the program map on it , so that people can find them anywhere in the country, and that website is the evidence based
13:52:34:Presenter: And don’t put in those programs are almost always free at a very low cost center. So this is not trying to sell anybody anything.
13:52:34:Presenter: So talk to the people to the day, and that’s the way you get in the program. And then I would coming to say one other thing that really gonna get people want to do resource which i know caregiver sometimes have a hard time leaving home, but there are lots and lots of free community programs on living. With chronic conditions on pain exercise all of which have been shown to be helpful to people that is there evidence space. And there’s a wonderful website with the program map on it. So that people can find them anywhere in the country, and that website is the evidence based leadership console.
13:52:48:Presenter: Sure the other thing I would add two is that, you know, if your partner is going to support groups for their condition.
13:53:00:Presenter: Make sure you capitalist way through two people in many organizations do. I know this time is so she ation does, I don’t park in since does and I’m sure many others do as well.
13:53:40:Presenter: One of the main features of the Seattle young adult stroke survivors group is we have a two hour meeting every month but after the first half hour we have a separate break out just for caregivers. So they can step out into a separate room and talk about their own concerns with other caregivers and get the support that they need and really get that out that experience of talking with other folks who are going through. Same thing and talk about things they just don’t feel comfortable coming out with our structure by being part.
13:53:48:Presenter: Who said no sorts of things? I just asked that incredibly helpful for everybody involved.
13:54:00:Presenter: This is going to save an hour had long sleeve an that is.
13:54:13:Presenter: When things are all going to screwed up going wrong and you don’t think you can do, it for another minute or you need a break just stop and take three deep deep breaths.
13:54:29:Presenter: Hello. And think about the bra it seems, it’s kind of a tiny mini vacation and people will to me are what did your math. Do, there’s this is all this stuff is going on I haven’t yet of.
13:54:33:Presenter: Airline fares try it if you don’t like it, you don’t have to do it again.
13:54:46:Presenter: But just simply taking breath.
13:54:53:Presenter: Sometimes enough to release this stress at the moment. So that you can continue doing what you’re doing for a bit longer.
13:54:53:Presenter: That would be my trip of the week very simple probably almost two simple, but very powerful.
13:55:10:Presenter: Awesome simple and fundamental to everything about life saw one of the things that the peties neotys kept having to tell me in rehab was to go ahead and breathe.
13:55:18:Presenter: Well, I’m thrilled to be joining you in and waiting us today. If I can be a resource to folks, I’d be happy to do that.
13:55:41:Presenter: I simply wish you well on your journey it sounds like you are making the proverbial lemonade out of a really sour lemon and I congratulate you on that. And I also congratulate whoever is helping you in this journey because for you to be doing this means that they’re doing something right.
13:55:52:Presenter: Absolutely cabinets in Penn Ellis. I should be in help. Let me know and I. Thank you for this opportunity.
13:55:58:Presenter: So that’s it for this week.
13:56:15:Presenter: It was great chatting with Kate about her work and about her book. So I’d encourage you to check out the building better caregivers book over at Bull Pub or on Amazon if you are a caregiver or if you are looking for a gift for a caregiver that, you know.
13:56:25:Presenter: If you are a caregiver prepare list of tasks ahead of time. So that when someone asks how they can help you have an answer ready to go.
13:56:31:Presenter: If you want to help caregiver that offered to help them in a specific way.
13:56:35:Presenter: Come to them with ideas about how you can assist.
13:56:51:Presenter: When things get stressful remember to simply breathe if you’re new to stroke cast be sure to subscribe to stroke cast in Apple podcasts, the new Google podcast app or wherever it is that you choose to listen to your podcasts.
13:57:00:Presenter: Check out the show notes for this episode over its stroke gas dot com slash Kate will find all of the links we talked about including the link to buy the book.
13:57:04:Presenter: And, of course as always.
13:57:07:Presenter: Don’t get best.
13:57:10:Presenter: Get better.
13:57:15:Presenter: Thanks a lot.
13:57:16:Presenter: Well as well deserved next week.
13:57:39:Presenter: The stroke cast Bill Monroe and bills ghasts provide general information and entertainment not medical advice. Please do not make any changes to your treatment plan or the execution of your treatment plan without first consulting your personal doctor or medical team.
13:57:49:Presenter: The stroke cast is a product production of the currently speaking podcast network.